The Ordering of Genes

One of the most important discoveries of molecular biology was that some genes are more influential than others. The reason for this is that genes are set out in a very complicated order. In the fundamental genetic hierarchy there are genes charged with carrying out functions that are repeated: making haemoglobin, hair growth, or the production of digestive enzymes for instance. There are "ordering" genes placed over these worker molecules. These make the worker molecules work, and also stop them from doing so. For example, they stop the haemoglobin gene from functioning during childhood. There is a series of "main controls" over both the workers and "middle management." Their decisions affect dozens, even hundreds of sub-units. These genes are so vital that it can be fatal if they are damaged during the embryo stage.

That is a fact that requires careful consideration. Genes are molecules made up of atoms. So, how did these molecules set up such an ordered organization amongst themselves? How is it that a molecule can take the decision to halt someone's growth and relay that decision to other genes, so that they may receive, obey and implement it? Who set up that discipline? Furthermore, trillions of genes have been flawlessly carrying out the same functions for millions of years, with the same discipline, obedience, intelligence and consciousness.

To claim that such a system emerged by coincidence is utterly specious. There is no doubt that it is God, the Lord, who programs the genes so cleverly and perfectly.